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    Katie Delahaye Paine (twitter: KDPaine) is the CEO and founder of KDPaine & Partners LLC and author of, Measuring Public Relationships, the data-driven communicators guide to measuring success. She also writes the first blog and the first newsletters dedicated entirely to measurement and accountability. In the last two decades, she and her firm have listened to millions of conversations, analyzed thousands of articles, and asked hundreds of question in order to help her clients better understand their relationships with their constituencies. People talk, we listen..

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April 23, 2008

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» Influencer Marketing Not As Relevant Today? from PR Communications
Katie Paine commented on the keynote session with Richard Binhammer at the New Comm Forum, and how Richard described how Dell's focus was on customers, not influencers. Also, Nick Hayes discussion with Paul Gillin mentioned customers buy products not i... [Read More]

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Duncan Brown

Hi Katie,

Nick's point (and one we make in the book) is that, because influencers don't buy stuff, you can't have a normal sales/marketing conversation with them. You need to talk differently to influencers, find out what their agenda is and fulfil it.

So, relationships are key, as Richard says. Influencers are found in a wide variety of places, including within and beyond the supply chain.

Hope this makes sense!

Duncan
(Nick's co-author)

Zena Weist

Agree with you Katie, we are moving from the me-first, me-shout, to me-listen, us-converse, customer-1st.

Great to see you at NewComm!

Paul Marsden

hi KD - good post; the flip from influencers to customers brings us into line with the the business consultants mantra that it is customers propensity to recommend (not influencers') that is the key reputation metric (Net Promoter Score). But in this model - trade relations become critical, because trade lie between the firm and the customer - (so should we mapping the sales chain rather than the influence chain?) and within the trade, there are certainly are influencers. It's influencers Jim, but not as we know it!

Tom O'Brien

Hi KD:

Thanks for the post. I love the quote "influencers don't buy stuff" because this is a really important point - especially in social media measurement. Also - like richard@dell's clarification above - we want relationships.

Relationships is the big challenge in the social media world - and it is really different than campaigns.

TO'B

Tom O'Brien

Hi KD:

Thanks for the post. I love the quote "influencers don't buy stuff" because this is a really important point - especially in social media measurement. Also - like richard@dell's clarification above - we want relationships.

Relationships is the big challenge in the social media world - and it is really different than campaigns.

TO'B

RichardatDELL

Hi KD

First how great to take a virtual world "know you" and make it real world know you. Thank you.

And just to add a finer point...its not just "buy stuff" its who I want relationships with, not just the transactional buy stuff..but relations, our customers :-)

Great to chat and look forward to more

Mike Keliher

It was wonderful to meet you this morning. I wish you had been a little more actively involved in that session you were moderating, but that's another matter.

You're right about that idea being one of the key takeaways, but I'm not sure it's safe to say, broadly, that social media work is getting past the "notice me, follow me" stage.

True, a good number of people are doing great work that uses social media tools, platforms, concepts -- stuff that goes well beyond "notice me, follow me." But those folks are in the extreme minority and are on the sharpest part of the cutting edge.

So you're right in that this part of the industry is at a point in which it can be truly valuable, but it's still very much in the early phases -- rife with "notice me, follow me, comment on me, Digg me..."

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